Movie News

‘Bad Boys for Life,’ ‘1917’ Blast Past $100 Million at Box Office

  • The Wrap
‘Bad Boys for Life,’ ‘1917’ Blast Past $100 Million at Box Office
Sony’s “Bad Boys for Life” and Universal’s “1917” continue to drive the box office, as both films will cross $100 million domestic this weekend.

Bad Boys for Life” will take No. 1 again with an estimated $30 million second weekend, a 52% drop from the threequel’s $62.5 million 3-day opening that would give it a domestic total of $117 million. “1917,” which is in its third weekend wide, is estimated to earn $14 million to bring its total to $102 million domestic.

1917” will be the fourth Best Picture Oscar nominee in this year’s field to cross the $100 million mark, joining “Joker,” “Ford v Ferrari,” and ‘Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood.” Another nominee, Sony’s “Little Women,” is close to the mark with $4.2 million grossed in its fifth weekend and a $93 million total. If and
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Sony Pushes ‘Uncharted’ Movie Back 3 Months, Takes ‘Masters of the Universe’ Off the Schedule

  • The Wrap
Sony Pushes ‘Uncharted’ Movie Back 3 Months, Takes ‘Masters of the Universe’ Off the Schedule
Sony has pushed back the release date of its live-action adaptation of “Uncharted” from Dec 18, 2020 to March 5, 2021, the date originally set aside for the studio’s live-action adaptation of the “Masters of the Universe” cartoon series and toy line.

Masters of the Universe” has subsequently been removed from Sony’s release schedule and is now dated “TBD” by the studio.

Based on the popular Playstation action-adventure video game series, “Uncharted” will star Tom Holland as Nathan Drake, a treasure hunter and adventurer whose quests for rare and mythical artifacts often runs him afoul of drug lords, war criminals and other assorted bad guys. A director for the film hasn’t been formally announced, but just this month Ruben Fleischer became Sony’s top choice.
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Film News Roundup: ‘The Irishman,’ ‘Marriage Story’ Added to Criterion Collection

Film News Roundup: ‘The Irishman,’ ‘Marriage Story’ Added to Criterion Collection
Four Netflix titles will be released on Blu-ray through the Criterion CollectionMartin Scorsese’s “The Irishman,” Noah Baumbach’s “Marriage Story,” documentary “American Factory” and Mati Diop’s “Atlantics.”

The streaming service had announced last year that Alfonso Cuaron’s “Roma” would be the first Netflix film to receive a home video debut via the Criterion Collection. Criterion specializes in licensing high-profile films and selling them to film aficionados.

The Irishman,” starring Robert DeNiro, received five Golden Globe nominations, ten BAFTA nominations and ten Academy Award nominations. It was the ninth Oscar nomination for Scorsese as a director, making him the most-nominated living director in Academy history.

“Marriage
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Anaconda’ Reboot in the Works at Sony With ‘Divergent’ Writer

‘Anaconda’ Reboot in the Works at Sony With ‘Divergent’ Writer
Sony Pictures is in early development of a reboot of the “Anaconda” franchise, hiring “Divergent” writer Evan Daugherty to write the project.

The studio has not set up the project with a producer, director or actors.

Sony released the original “Anaconda” in 1997 as a horror thriller starring Jennifer Lopez, Ice Cube, Jon Voight, Eric Stoltz and Owen Wilson. Directed by Luis Llosa, the plot centered on Lopez’ character heading a documentary film crew looking for a long-lost tribe along the Amazon River, only to see the expedition taken over by a nefarious snake hunter, played by Voight, leading to several horrific encounters with a massive green serpent.

Anaconda” was a success with a worldwide gross of $135 million on a $45 million budget. That led to a 2004 sequel “Anacondas: The Hunt for the Blood Orchid,” set in Borneo, as the protagonists sought a life-extending flower on a remote island inhabited by deadly snakes.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Margot Robbie, ‘Birds of Prey’ Co-Stars Justify the Movie’s R-Rating, Violence and Cussing

Margot Robbie, ‘Birds of Prey’ Co-Stars Justify the Movie’s R-Rating, Violence and Cussing
Following the success of “Joker” last year, DC Films is continuing its gritty streak with “Birds of Prey,” a slam-bang adventure about Harley Quinn.

Though DC Film’s 2016 tentpole “Suicide Squad” took a critical bashing at the time, filmgoers quickly took a liking to Margot Robbie’s portrayal of Harley Quinn. “Birds of Prey” gives the fan favorite character her own adventure, having her ditch the male-dominated Squad to work alongside a rogues’ gallery of women.

For the creators behind the upcoming movie, an R-rating was the only way the project made any sense.

“Harley’s not really someone to hold back,” Robbie told Variety‘s Marc Malkin on Thursday at the opening of Harleywood in Hollywood. “The R-rating really allowed us to take it to the next level with fight scenes.”

Director Cathy Yan added, “The women are unabashedly themselves and very unapologetic in the movie. It was very
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Olivia Wilde Says Greta Gerwig ‘Surely Deserved’ a Best Director Oscar Nom for ‘Little Women’

  • Indiewire
Olivia Wilde Says Greta Gerwig ‘Surely Deserved’ a Best Director Oscar Nom for ‘Little Women’
Did “Little Women” direct itself? That was the question on many Oscar-watchers’ minds the morning that the five — all-male — Best Director nominees were announced by the Academy. “Little Women” managed to grab six Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture and Best Adapted Screenplay for Greta Gerwig, who ultimately did not land a Director nod.

In a recent interview with Vulture, “Booksmart” director and “Richard Jewell” star Olivia Wilde echoed claims that Gerwig should’ve been among the final five.

“It’s hard, because you look at someone like Greta Gerwig — her film was nominated for Best Picture, so surely she deserved a Best Director nomination. How can you recognize a film for Best Picture and not award that director with the same recognition? And she deserves it,” Wilde told Vulture. “And so does Alma Har’el, and Lulu Wang, and Lorene Scafaria. It’s been an astonishing year for female directors.
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Brad Pitt Looks Back on ‘Snatch’, ‘Oceans 12’, ‘Once Upon a Time…’ and More at Sbiff

The 35th Santa Barbara International Film Festival (Sbiff) presented its highest honor, the Maltin Modern Master Award, to actor Brad Pitt at the Arlington Theatre on January 21st. The award was created to honor an individual who has enriched our culture through accomplishments in the motion picture industry, and the evening was a celebration of his work, not only in his two most recent films, Once Upon A Time in Hollywood and Ad Astra, but also his entire film catalog. During the …
See full article at Collider.com »

Laika’s ‘Missing Link’ Joins Collider’s Fyc Screening at Arclight

The Oscar-nominated animated film Missing Link from acclaimed stop-motion studio Laika has been added to Collider’s Fyc Screening Series at ArcLight Hollywood. On Wednesday, January 29th, there will be a post-screening Q&a with writer/director Chris Butler. Missing Link is about a lonely Sasquatch who teams up with an English explorer to travel to the Himalayas to meet his distant cousins, who are Yetis. The film already took home the Golden Globe for Best Animated Feature Film, and is a top contender for the Best Animated Feature Academy Award. Laika is one of the …
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‘Us Kids’ Review: Scattered Parkland Shooting Doc Tackles Helplessness of Living With America’s Gun Crisis

How do you make a movie about the gun crisis in America? How do you document a plague in a country that has become so desensitized to the pain it causes? How — at a time of such rampant inhumanity that millions of people seem resigned to even the most preventable horrors — do you possibly make a film that resonates with this amnesiac nation in a way that regular images of murdered club-goers, concert attendees, religious worshippers, multiplex patrons, Walmart shoppers, children, children, children, and always more children, have not?

If these aren’t rhetorical questions, that’s only because well-intentioned filmmakers like Kim A. Snyder will be reckoning with them for a long time to come. We’re lucky for their resolve; they accomplish more by failing to find the right answers than our entire political establishment does by settling for the wrong ones. In 2016’s “Newtown,” Snyder vivisected the
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‘Us Kids’: Film Review

The nonstop drama of the Trump White House has succeeded, among other things, in largely pushing gun control from the forefront of the news cycle — no doubt to the relief of the NRA and its allies, despite the continued frequency of U.S. mass shootings. As a result, and perhaps unfairly, Kim A. Snyder’s “Us Kids” feels a bit like old news, as it focuses on a school massacre and the subsequent activist tide that occurred less than two years ago, yet somehow already feel distant. Nonetheless, who themselves just survived a school shooting.

Where Snyder’s 2016 “Newtown” held to the perspective of parents grieving after a gunman killed 26 people (including 20 first-graders) at Connecticut’s Sandy Hook Elementary in late 2012, “Kids” charts the very different reaction of students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High in Parkland, Fla., a little over five years later. When another gunman (this time an alumnus
See full article at Variety - Film News »

“We Took a Minimalist, Naturalistic Approach”: Dp Charlie Sarroff on Relic

The devastation of dementia is translated into a haunted house horror film in Natalie Erika James’ Relic. It follows Edna (Robyn Nevin) after she mysteriously disappears from her home, causing her daughter and granddaughter great worry. She eventually returns without an idea of where she was, and it appears that something sinister follower her back. Dp Charlie Sarroff talks about the inspirations for the visual style of Relic and the equipment that made it happen. Filmmaker: How and why did you wind up being the cinematographer of your film? What were the factors and attributes that led to your being […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

‘Come Away’ Review: A Delightful Origin Story of Peter Before Pan and Alice Before Wonderland [Sundance 2020]

‘Come Away’ Review: A Delightful Origin Story of Peter Before Pan and Alice Before Wonderland [Sundance 2020]
When animation directors make the jump to directing live-action, the transition can be fraught. Just ask Andrew Stanton, whose live-action debut, John Carter, was a huge bomb for Disney several years ago. Thankfully though, Brenda Chapman, the director of Prince of Egypt and Pixar’s Oscar-winning Brave, successfully makes the leap with Come Away, a delightful […]

The post ‘Come Away’ Review: A Delightful Origin Story of Peter Before Pan and Alice Before Wonderland [Sundance 2020] appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

‘The Mole Agent’ Review: The Most Heartwarming Spy Movie Ever Made

There’s a certain immersive thrill that comes from documentaries that hide themselves, and “The Mole Agent” epitomizes that appeal. Chilean director Maite Alberdi’s delightful character study unfolds as an intricate spy thriller, in which a sweet-natured 83-year-old widower infiltrates a nursing home at the behest of a private detective. The plan goes awry with all kinds of comical and touching results, so well-assembled within a framework of fictional tropes that it begs for an American remake.

But as much as such a product might appeal to companies hungry for content, it would be redundant from the outset, because “The Mole Agent” is already one of the most heartwarming spy movies of all time —

It starts with an unusual solicitation: Detective Rómulo Aitken, a former criminal investigator, puts an advertisement in the newspaper for a man between the ages of 80 and 90 years to complete a three-month gig. From his noir-shaded office,
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2020 Sundance Film Festival: Portraits From Variety’s Studio

The first major film festival of the year, the Sundance Film Festival is the perfect hub to discover new talents, titles and trends for the next wave of film.

This year is no different. With the upcoming presidential election, several of the major films being showcased at Sundance mix politics with art. There is “Hillary,” the four-hour Hulu documentary following Hillary Clinton’s run to become the first woman to capture a political party’s nomination for president in the last election. Out of the festival’s more than 100 films is also a Gloria Steinem biopic starring Julianne Moore and Alicia Vikander, who play Steinem at different ages.

Justin Simien, the creator of “Dear White People,” is also debuting “Bad Hair,” a horror satire about a killer black weave that doubles as an allegory for racial inequality. The film stars Elle Lorraine, Vanessa Williams, Jay Pharoah, Lena Waithe, Blair Underwood and Laverne Cox.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Olivia Wilde Thinks Greta Gerwig Deserved A Best Director Nomination For ‘Little Women’

One of the many, many frustrating things about being a sports fan is the way pundits play fast-and-loose with the definition of the industry. Baseball, for example, is a game when it benefits specific parties and a business when it doesn’t. This kind of double-speak sometimes makes it difficult to have a coherent conversation about the failings of the sport. Players are asking for a bunch of money? They should be happy they make a living playing a children’s game!

Continue reading Olivia Wilde Thinks Greta Gerwig Deserved A Best Director Nomination For ‘Little Women’ at The Playlist.
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“It Was Important to Draw Out Tension and Let the Awkwardness Breathe”: Editor Sean Lahiff on Relic

Natalia Erika Jame adapts the real-world terror of degenerative disease into a supernatural horror film in Relic. Edna, an aging woman, is feared for by her daughter and granddaughter after she abruptly disappears, leaving in her wake the signs of someone struggling with dementia. One day, she inexplicably returns, and a dangerous entity may have come back with her. Editor Sean Lahiff talks about why he so enjoys editing the “darker side of genre films.” Filmmaker: How and why did you wind up being the editor of your film? What were the factors and attributes that led to your being […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

How Logan Paul and Ninja Helped ‘Spree’ Cast Capture Influencer Culture Gone Wild

How Logan Paul and Ninja Helped ‘Spree’ Cast Capture Influencer Culture Gone Wild
When it came to depicting the gonzo nature of influencer culture, “Spree” stars Joe Keery and Sasheer Zamata and director Eugene Kotlyarenko did a deep dive into the haves and have-nots of the internet.

Spree,” which premiered Friday at Sundance Film Festival, follows a rideshare driver named Kurt Kunkle (Keery) who will stop at nothing to go viral.

“He’s been trying to do this influencer thing for almost a decade,” Kotlyarenko explained at Variety’s Studio at Sundance. “He finally came up with this breakthrough viral concept, and he’s just going to take it to the limit. This is Kurt’s big moment.”

Kotlyarenko calls the movie — filmed to appear as a livestream — a dark cultural satire, one that takes the good, but mostly the bad, of social media to disturbing heights.

“Influencers are kind of iconic and also caricatured versions of a normal person because they’re
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Marvel Cancels ‘Howard the Duck’ and ‘Tigra and Dazzler’ Animated Shows at Hulu

At the beginning of December last year, Marvel’s Tigra and Dazzler Show intended for Hulu had a shake-up behind the scenes that resulted in the firing of the showrunner and the entire writing staff of the animated series due to creative differences with Marvel. Now the show has been axed completely, and the Howard the […]

The post Marvel Cancels ‘Howard the Duck’ and ‘Tigra and Dazzler’ Animated Shows at Hulu appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

“Feels as if Time Is Unspooling in Front of Our Eyes”: Editor Gabriel Rhodes on Time

Fox and Rob Rich are married, but they’ve been apart for 21 years—Rob is currently serving a 60-year sentence for a crime that they both committed. Fox has been diligently fighting for the release of her husband, while also filming home footage to share with Rob so he can watch his six children grow and observe the home life he cannot be a part of. Garrett Bradley’s documentary feature debut Time explores the violent oppression of African American people entrenched in America’s prison system and editor Gabriel Rhodes elaborates on the process of weaving archival, home and interview footage together […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

‘Boys State’ Review: When Texan Teens Take Over the Government, Democracy Gets Ugly

‘Boys State’ Review: When Texan Teens Take Over the Government, Democracy Gets Ugly
Depending on one’s perspective, the American political machine invites both cynical and idealistic interpretations, and “Boys State” embodies both of them. Directors Jesse Moss and Amanda McBaine’s sprawling look at the weeklong Texas event, where 17-year-old boys create their own representational government, .

Juggling several mini-profiles over the course of an election cycle that gets dirty, “Boys State” goes a little too soft on its subjects, attempting a balanced perspective at a moment that demands more partisan insight. Nevertheless, it manages to capture the systematic forces behind American leadership, and why it always seems like such an uphill challenge to put the good guys in charge.

Adults consume such little screen time that the movie may as well be the “Peanuts” of civic lessons. As “Boys State” explains upfront, the veterans association American Legion has assembled the eponymous gathering at states around the country since 1935, during which time alumni
See full article at Indiewire »
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