Indie News

Sundance Film Festival Announces New Frontier Lineup For 2020

  • Deadline
Sundance Film Festival Announces New Frontier Lineup For 2020
The Sundance Film Festival announced its New Frontier Lineup for the 2020 edition, a curated collection of cutting-edge indie experimental media works by creators who are pushing artistic boundaries in various mediums including rocket travel, biotech, facial recognition, mixed reality (Mr), smartphone Ar, underwater Vr, game engines, big data, AI, the human archive, and innovative uses of SMS text & iPhone video capture.

There are two dedicated venue spaces: New Frontier at The Ray and New Frontier Central, each of which host a variety of media installations, a Vr Cinema, and panel discussions. New this year, New Frontier Central also houses the Biodigital Theatre, a cutting-edge presentation space that will feature a rotating schedule of large scale Vr theatrical works including a feature-length livestream game telecast.

Robert Redford, President and Founder of Sundance Institute, said in statement, “Technology infuses most aspects of modern life — and is evolving at a historic pace. The
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The Best Movie Posters of 2019

  • MUBI
1. The Last Black Man in San FranciscoNo surprises here if you’ve seen my Best of the Decade list, in which this design came in at #4. To be honest, I could almost have filled an entire top ten with Akiko Stehrenberger’s 2019 posters. In the last few weeks alone she has released a stunning alternative art print for Breathless, superb new posters for Honey Boy, Bikram: Yogi, Guru, Predator, and, most notably, a gorgeous minimalist optical illusion for Portrait of a Lady on Fire. But my favorite of the year still remains this miracle. As I said in my decade poll, “this was the second poster by Akiko that A24 released for The Last Black Man in San Francisco. The first was masterful and striking and beautifully painted, but the second one was next level...a conceptual piece that conveys both place (the impossibly steep streets of the titular city
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Review: Terrence Malick's Ecstatically Anti-Fascist "A Hidden Life"

  • MUBI
There are few working filmmakers with whom you feel an electric encounter with the world that he or she is filming, an awe and fascination with what is before the camera and can be transmitted through it. One of these rare practitioners is Terrence Malick, who this year returned to the Cannes competition (The Tree of Life won the Palme d’Or in 2011) with A Hidden Life, an adaptation of the real story of Franz Jägerstätter, an Austrian farmer who refused to join Hitler’s Wehrmacht, was arrested for this, and eventually executed. The film opens in the small mountain town of St. Radegund and astonishing visions of mountains embracing a verdant and idyllic landscape, home for the life, work, and love of Jägerstätter and his wife Fani (Valerie Pachner). This is an idealized, innocent utopia like the South Pacific islands in The Thin Red Line or pre-Columbus America in The New World,
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‘Richard Jewell’ Dispute Intensifies, as Olivia Wilde and Screenwriter Billy Ray Weigh in

  • Indiewire
‘Richard Jewell’ Dispute Intensifies, as Olivia Wilde and Screenwriter Billy Ray Weigh in
The battle of truth versus fiction in Clint Eastwood’s “Richard Jewell” intensified Thursday as screenwriter Billy Ray shot back at Kevin Riley, the editor of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Riley, who has criticized the movie for suggesting that reporter Kathy Scruggs traded sex for news tips while reporting on the investigation into the 1996 Atlanta bombing, has lawyered up in preparation for a defamation lawsuit. Ray is calling that threatened suit a “distraction campaign” to divert attention from what he claims is the paper’s sloppy reporting on the case that led to the shattered reputation of Jewell, a security guard who was treated as the prime suspect in the case.

Scruggs was one of the reporters who named Jewell as a suspect in the bombing. Jewell was innocent, but the newspaper’s report helped put Jewell’s life under scrutiny for an extended period of time, prompting him to file
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Moviegoing Memories: Victor Kossakovsky

  • MUBI
Moviegoing Memories is a series of short interviews with filmmakers about going to the movies. Victor Kossakovsky's Aquarela is Mubi Go's Film of the Week of December 13, 2019.Notebook: How would you describe your movie in the least amount of words?Victor Kossakovsky: What if we do not talk about water but just look to it! This is an example of how a film can show a story instead of telling a story.Notebook: Where and what is your favorite movie theater? Why is it your favorite?Kossakovsky: My favorite cinema theater is the Aurora on the main street of St.Petersburg - Nevsky Prospect. It is oldest cinema in Russia; it was opened in 1913. It is not a huge cinema theater—only 590 seats—but it has perfect proportions of the room and a 100 square meters screen. I loved to go there since my childhood. I saw many great films there,
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Review: The Gleaming Thrills of "Uncut Gems"

  • MUBI
If you want to be grabbed by the throat, then I’ve got just the movie for you: Josh and Benny Safdie's Uncut Gems. Like the brothers’ last two features, Heaven Knows What (2014) and Good Time (2017), it’s a showboating immersion into a gritty but resiliently existent side of New York that is nowadays rarely set to film. And like Good Time, their collision of Robert Pattinson with a borough-based B-film, Uncut Gems is driven by the monomania of its protagonist, Harold Ratner, and the stunt-casting appeal of the actor who plays him: Adam Sandler. Ratner is a Jewish jeweler in Midtown’s Diamond District and another addict looking for a rush—in this case, the rush of moving capital around with dangerous risks at the hope of a big pay off.The film opens with Ratner in debt and in panic, and its anxiety only climbs higher from there.
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‘Black Christmas’ Review: Gutsy Rape Revenge Slasher Bleeds For MeToo

‘Black Christmas’ Review: Gutsy Rape Revenge Slasher Bleeds For MeToo
If the original 1974 “Black Christmas” had to obscure its feminism with subversion, subtlety, and a flirtatious Margot Kidder, the latest remake of the classic slasher film wears it proudly on its crop-top sleeve. When #MeToo launched an international conversation around rape and sexual assault in 2016, survivors breathed a collective sigh of relief that people finally believed them. Women knew about the domination of toxic male behavior for years; it didn’t take a genius to see that the calls were coming from inside the house.

In her gutsy and glossy remake, director Sophia Takal builds a timely horror out of the gaslighting and disbelief many survivors know all too well. Using the hyper-gendered spaces of college Greek life as a fertile palette, Takal and her co-writer April Wolfe skewer toxic masculinity, the white male literary canon, rape culture, patriarchy, and white male rage — all wrapped up with a bow in
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Is That Movie Worth Paying For? Vudu Offers ‘Rental Redo’ For the Commitment-Phobic

  • Indiewire
Amazon, AMC, and Apple may have an alphabetic advantage, but they’re just the first three of many outlets that all do the same thing: offer identical opportunities to rent thousands and thousands of titles, with little to no difference in price, quality, or delivery. However, Vudu believes it’s found a way to gain an edge: If you don’t like the movie, it will give your money back.

With “Rental Redo,” viewers can cancel a rental within the first 30 minutes of watching a movie and receive a refund (capped at four times per month). The Walmart-owned company will also refund the difference if the title is available for less on Amazon or iTunes. Both the price match and redo refunds come in the form of rental credits.

It could be popular, given the Add viewing habits of home viewers. For Netflix’s “The Irishman,” just 18% of people
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Olivia Wilde Attempts Damage Control On Disputed Portrayal In ‘Richard Jewell’

It goes without saying that when Olivia Wilde agreed to star in Clint Eastwood’s “Richard Jewell” she didn’t believe she’d find herself in a controversy over the character she was playing, real-life Atlanta Journal Constitution reporter Kathy Scruggs. The portrayal of Scruggs has been criticised by both independent media who have seen the film and the Ajc itself as depicting Scruggs using sex for sourcing. Following the bombing at the 1996 Olympic Games, Scruggs and fellow Ajc reporter Ron Martz broke a story that the hero who found the explosives, Richard Jewell (played by Paul Walter Hauser) , may have actually planted the bomb..

Continue reading Olivia Wilde Attempts Damage Control On Disputed Portrayal In ‘Richard Jewell’ at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘Harriet,’ ‘Little Women,’ and ‘Bombshell’: Female Empowerment Through Wardrobe

  • Indiewire
‘Harriet,’ ‘Little Women,’ and ‘Bombshell’: Female Empowerment Through Wardrobe
Female empowerment through wardrobe was creatively on display in “Harriet,” “Little Women,” and “Bombshell.” Underground Railroad leader Harriet Tubman (Cynthia Erivo) was transformed into a 19th-century superhero; Saoirse Ronan’s proto-feminist author Jo March’s tomboy look made her a 19th century iconoclast; and Megyn Kelly (Charlize Theron), Gretchen Carlson (Nicole Kidman), and Kayla Pospisil (Margot Robbie) became eye-catching free spirits who took down the Roger Ailes (John Lithgow) culture of sexual harassment at Fox News.

For Kasi Lemmons’ zeitgeist-grabbing biopic of Harriet Tubman, costume designer Paul Tazewell (“Hamilton”) wanted her “looks to not feel like we’d seen them before,” he said. “Where she starts, we definitely had to understand her as a slave. But then, as she recreates herself as modern to the period where she was from — and realizes herself as a free, black woman — there are [costuming] choices that I hoped would resonate in an emotional way to underscore the story.
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Ron Howard and Brian Grazer Want to Democratize Hollywood Filmmaking With Imagine Impact

  • Indiewire
Ron Howard and Brian Grazer Want to Democratize Hollywood Filmmaking With Imagine Impact
In 2012, before he became an Imagine Entertainment screenwriter, Justin Calen-Chenn received his film education in a crappy hotel room. He’d already worked on a handful of short films, but he also had a life in the violent Los Angeles underworld that forced him to spend weeks hiding out. To pass the time, he read classic screenplays like “Midnight Cowboy” while eating Domino’s Pizza.

Four years later, a close friend suffered a brutal death and Calen-Chenn said that’s when everything changed. “I had the choice to continue to the top, or give it all up,” he said.

Calen-Chenn, who’s now 36, chose the latter. He and his creative partner Stephen “Dr” Love workshopped “The 99” as part of Imagine Impact, an intense, eight-week program that seeks unknown or underrepresented writers with unique stories and gets their projects ready for sale.

An offshoot of Ron Howard and Brian Grazer’s Imagine,
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‘The Lord of the Rings’: Everything You Need to Know About Amazon’s Big Money Adaptation

  • Indiewire
‘The Lord of the Rings’: Everything You Need to Know About Amazon’s Big Money Adaptation
While Amazon has become an Emmys juggernaut with more intimate series like “Fleabag” and “Marvelous Mrs. Maisel,” those kind of character-based stories are not all the streaming service does – or plans to do. And no upcoming series proves that point more than Amazon’s long-awaited, multi-season television adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings.”

Amazon has kept news about “The Lord of the Rings” as quiet as it possibly can, but IndieWire has compiled a list of the nine must-know details about the upcoming series. From its big shoes to fill as another Tolkien adaptation to its hush-hush casting, below is everything you need to know about Amazon’s “The Lord of the Rings.”

More from IndieWireWhat Does SAG Snubbing 'Succession' Mean For HBO's Prestige Drama Heir Apparent?'When They See Us': Acclaimed at the Critics' Choice, Snubbed at the Golden GlobesThe Best TV Shows of the Decade,
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‘Queen & Slim’ Director Says Golden Globes Voters Refused to Watch Film: ‘It’s Infuriating’

‘Queen & Slim’ Director Says Golden Globes Voters Refused to Watch Film: ‘It’s Infuriating’
In the aftermath of the 2020 Golden Globes stirring up controversy for not nominating any women in the Best Director and Best Screenplay categories, “Queen & Slim” director Melina Matsoukas is speaking out against the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA). Matsoukas tells Variety the HFPA, whose members vote for the Golden Globes, refused to watch “Queen & Slim” and skipped multiple Fyc screenings that were set for the movie.

“We held three screenings for the HFPA and almost no members attended,” Matsoukas said. “For me, it’s reflective of their voting body. It’s not reflective of the society in which we live in or the industry as it stands today. They don’t value the stories that represent all of us, and those stories are so often disregarded and discredited, as are their filmmakers.”

Matsoukas added, “It’s extremely discouraging. It’s extremely infuriating. And it just represents an archaic
See full article at Indiewire »

The Best TV Episodes of 2019

  • Indiewire
The Best TV Episodes of 2019
We’ve spent the better part of the last few weeks toasting not only the noteworthy TV accomplishments of this year, but the decade overall. With all the riches that TV has to offer, it can be hard to come up with new ways of saying, “Hey, this thing is good! You should try it if you haven’t already!”

So, at the risk of repeating ourselves, we’ve gathered the top achievements from 2019 on a purely episodic level. Some of these are chapters nested in a much grander arc that require hours of prior viewing to fully appreciate. Others are masterfully executed one-offs that can be enjoyed purely on their own.

Regardless of the reasons for us picking them here, these episodes all underline the idea that TV isn’t just a sea of 6- or 8- or 10- or 12-hour movies. At their best, they can highlight the
See full article at Indiewire »

All the New and Returning 2019-2020 Midseason TV Shows

  • Indiewire
All the New and Returning 2019-2020 Midseason TV Shows
The television season never really ends, it merely pivots to the nearest oncoming wave of brand new content. With that in mind, here’s a look ahead at the new and returning shows scheduled to debut during midseason 2019-2020. (This list will be updated as more networks and streaming services announce their lineups.)

More from IndieWire Kumail Nanjiani and Emily V. Gordon's 'Little America' Renewed for Season 2 on Apple TV+What Does SAG Snubbing 'Succession' Mean For HBO's Prestige Drama Heir Apparent?AT&T's HBO and Warner Bros. TV Lead Production Studio Tally at SAG Awards
See full article at Indiewire »

The Golden Globes Star-Gazing Continues To Grate — TV Podcast

The Golden Globes Star-Gazing Continues To Grate — TV Podcast
It’s been several days since the Hollywood Foreign Press Association announced its Golden Globe television nominations, but they aren’t sitting any better now than when they first surfaced.

Neither time nor distance has dulled the sting of the organization wholesale dismissing the work of Ava DuVernay’s Netflix limited series “When They See Us,” including the Emmy-winning performance of Jharrel Jerome. It’s also still painful to think about how with 30 acting spots available, the HFPA managed to only nominate three people of color — Rami Malek for USA’s “Mr. Robot,” Billy Porter for FX’s “Pose,” and Ramy Youssef for Hulu’s “Ramy.”

Instead, the Golden Globes opted to celebrate actors who are already familiar with accolades, thanks to their years spent on the red carpet circuit. Oscar-winners and Hollywood heavyweights were all over the TV nominations, creating a weird, insider version of six-degrees of separation. Alan Arkin
See full article at Indiewire »

Sundance Announces 2020 Festival New Frontier Selection

Thirty-two independent experimental and independent media projects comprising the 2020 Sundance Film Festival New Frontier program were announced today by the Sundance Institute. Included in what is often Sundance’s most surprising section are an art/journalism project riffing on the newsreel format by artist and Lemonade collaborator Khalil Joseph; an “under construction” AI based on the thoughts of linguist and critic Noam Chomsky; and a 35mm short consisting of 16,000 cuts. Also included are new works that are the latest installments in the lifelong practices of artist and filmmakers (and Sundance veterans) Lynn Hershman Leeson and Narcissister. Of note too is […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Sundance Announces 2020 Festival New Frontier Selection

Thirty-two independent experimental and independent media projects comprising the 2020 Sundance Film Festival New Frontier program were announced today by the Sundance Institute. Included in what is often Sundance’s most surprising section are an art/journalism project riffing on the newsreel format by artist and Lemonade collaborator Khalil Joseph; an “under construction” AI based on the thoughts of linguist and critic Noam Chomsky; and a 35mm short consisting of 16,000 cuts. Also included are new works that are the latest installments in the lifelong practices of artist and filmmakers (and Sundance veterans) Lynn Hershman Leeson and Narcissister. Of note too is […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Sundance 2020 Reveals New Frontier Slate, Including Films and Vr Experiences

Sundance 2020 Reveals New Frontier Slate, Including Films and Vr Experiences
The 2020 Sundance Film Festival has revealed its full lineup for the festival’s forward-thinking New Frontier section, which “spotlights work at the dynamic crossroads of film, art, and technology.” The curated collection of “cutting-edge independent and experimental media works are by creators who are pushing artistic innovation across mediums that include rocket travel, biotech, facial recognition, mixed reality (Mr), smartphone Ar, underwater Vr, game engines, big data, AI, the human archive, and innovative uses of SMS text & iPhone video capture.

Shari Frilot, Chief Curator of New Frontier,​ said in an official statement, “Powerful technologies now enable experiences that capture, replicate, and replace ‘the real.’ But it is even more special when the human touch converges with technology, we are provoked to reach beyond what we know to be real and enter into unfamiliar terrain. This transcendence can shift who we believe ourselves to be, where our bodies begin and end,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Cats’ Producer Says The Film’s Backlash Stems From “People Who Didn’t Know ‘Cats’”

As someone who works in the world of film and TV news, it’s sometimes hard for me to think that there’s a big world, filled with various opinions, outside of my little slice of social media. So, when the two “Cats” trailers were released, judging by my observations, it would appear that most people are genuinely creeped out, but somehow morbidly curious as to what director Tom Hooper is about to deliver.

Continue reading ‘Cats’ Producer Says The Film’s Backlash Stems From “People Who Didn’t Know ‘Cats’” at The Playlist.
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