Indie News

‘A Private War’ Goes Public With Aviron’s Word-of-Mouth Screenings

‘A Private War’ Goes Public With Aviron’s Word-of-Mouth Screenings
A Private War is expanding this month after its Nov. 2 launch in New York and L.A. The film, starring an excellent Rosamund Pike, is the perfect calling card for the new Aviron Pictures. The film embodies what Aviron is doing, but it’s also an exception to its rules.

“Most of our films are mid-budget feature films that we believe have the ability to be wide releases,” says Aviron president David Dinerstein. “But A Private War is a little different.”

Aviron execs knew this film would depend on word-of-mouth. It is a complex, adult drama, centering on war correspondent Marie Colvin, who reported from war zones in Africa and the Middle East for Sunday Times of London; the film covers her work for a decade, concluding in 2012.

Reviewing the film out of Toronto, Variety’s Peter Debruge praised it as an “incredibly sophisticated, psychologically immersive” film, adding that director
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Jim Carrey on Trump Ignoring California Wildfires: ‘This Is Manslaughter’

Jim Carrey on Trump Ignoring California Wildfires: ‘This Is Manslaughter’
Jim Carrey shared his most critical opinion of Donald Trump in a recent social media post about the president’s response to the California wildfires. As of November 15, CBS News reports that the Camp Fire in Northern California has killed 56 people, while CNN’s latest update on November 16 confirms there are more than 600 people missing because of the fire. Carrey said Trump’s ignorance over the wildfire is comparable to manslaughter.

“As the California death toll rises our Sadist-in-Chief is spending $220 million to send troops to the border for nothing,” Carrey wrote on Twitter. “That’s one way to get rid of Democrats. This is no longer politics. This is manslaughter.”

Carrey’s comment was accompanied by a gruesome painting of a burned corpse lying in the rubble of the wildfire. The actor not only criticized Trump’s refusal to take the wildfires seriously but also the president’s continued efforts at the U.
See full article at Indiewire »

William Goldman, Oscar-Winning Screenwriter of ‘Butch Cassidy,’ Dead at 87

William Goldman, Oscar-Winning Screenwriter of ‘Butch Cassidy,’ Dead at 87
William Goldman, the screenwriter best known for penning “All the President’s Men” and “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid,” has died at age 87. According to Deadline, Goldman’s health had been failing for sometime and he passed away surrounded by friends and family in his Manhattan home. Goldman started his career as a novelist before making the jump to screenwriter with the script for Basil Dearden’s 1965 comedy-thriller “Masquerade.”

“All The President’s Men” and “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” are widely considered to be Goldman’s greatest screenwriting achievements. “Butch Cassidy,” featuring the iconic pairing of Robert Redford and Paul Newman, won Goldman the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay at the 42nd Academy Awards. Goldman won over scripts for “Bonnie and Clyde” and “Two for the Road” that year. He earned his second Oscar for “All The President’s Men,” which won Best Adapted Screenplay at the
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William Goldman Has Died: Oscar-Winning Screenwriter Of ‘All The President’s Men’ Was 87

Academy Award-winning screenwriter and acclaimed novelist William Goldman died last night at age 87.

Goldman is probably best known for his Oscar wins for his scripting of the films “All the President’s Men” and “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.” However, those Robert Redford films only give the briefest of introductions to the incredible work done by this writer.

In addition to the aforementioned films, the writer also was responsible for scripts for films like “The Stepford Wives,” “Flowers for Algernon,” “Misery,” “Chaplin,” and “A Bridge Too Far,” among many more.

Continue reading William Goldman Has Died: Oscar-Winning Screenwriter Of ‘All The President’s Men’ Was 87 at The Playlist.
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Watch: Olivier Assayas Discusses Ingmar Bergman’s ‘Absurdly Important’ Persona

Olivier Assayas speaks eloquently about his own work, able to talk about them both abstractly and practically. No surprise, then, that he’s as sharp when talking about other filmmakers’ films. A new video from Tiff finds the acclaimed French filmmaker — most recently of Non Fiction, Personal Shopper and Clouds of Sils Maria, and whose 1994 classic Cold Water was reissued earlier this year — talking Ingmar Bergman. Specifically he discusses Persona, the Swedish legend’s game-changing 1966 whatzit, about a caretaker (Bibi Andersson) tending to a damaged actress (Liv Ullmann). Bergman, according to Assayas, showed “that you could be both […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Watch: Olivier Assayas Discusses Ingmar Bergman’s ‘Absurdly Important’ Persona

Olivier Assayas speaks eloquently about his own work, able to talk about them both abstractly and practically. No surprise, then, that he’s as sharp when talking about other filmmakers’ films. A new video from Tiff finds the acclaimed French filmmaker — most recently of Non Fiction, Personal Shopper and Clouds of Sils Maria, and whose 1994 classic Cold Water was reissued earlier this year — talking Ingmar Bergman. Specifically he discusses Persona, the Swedish legend’s game-changing 1966 whatzit, about a caretaker (Bibi Andersson) tending to a damaged actress (Liv Ullmann). Bergman, according to Assayas, showed “that you could be both […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Sundance Wish List: 70 Films We Hope Will Head to Park City in 2019

  • Indiewire
Sundance Wish List: 70 Films We Hope Will Head to Park City in 2019
The Sundance Film Festival has gone through many changes in its 35 years, evolving from Robert Redford’s experimental incubator for independent filmmaking to the most influential festival event in the country. The 2019 edition is no exception: With Kim Yutani taking over as director of programming following the departure of longtime programming head Trevor Groth, much of the independent film community expects a lineup that reflects the shift in vision. Of course, Yutani still reports to Sundance veteran John Cooper, the festival’s director, and some Sundance movies will always be safe bets.

IndieWire’s annual Sundance wish list reflects much of the intel making the rounds, as well as some educated guesswork, based on various projects that have been submitted or seem likely to submit ahead of the festival’s deadlines. Last year’s hefty wish list included many films that make the cut, so take this overview seriously — but
See full article at Indiewire »

High Risk, High Reward: ‘Widows’ Will Be a Defining Studio Release of 2018

  • Indiewire
Today, 20th Century Fox opens Steve McQueen’s “Widows.” Budgeted at $40 million, its first-weekend projection is $20 million. That suggests a performance similar to several recent mid-budget studio releases like “Outlander” or “The Girl In The Spider’s Web,” most of which failed to make a significant dent (only “Night School” grossed over $50 million).

However, “Widows” stands apart: The director won Best Picture with “12 Years a Slave,” and star Viola Davis won Best Supporting Actress for “Fences.” It also has terrific advance reviews, prime festival placement, real awards possibilities — and its box office success would have a much greater impact on upcoming production decisions.

With roots in fine art, McQueen has made a big impact in a short time. His 2008 debut “Hunger” about Ira member Bobby Sands was a breakout role for Michael Fasssbender (though it did little domestic business). His sex addict drama “Shame,” again with Fassbender, did better but still very niche business.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Mary Queen Of Scots’: Saoirse Ronan & Margot Robbie Are Both Royalty In This Gleefully Feminist Drama [Review]

Despite its ruff collars and Elizabethan English, “Mary Queen of Scots” is no staid, stuffy period drama, as restrained as the breathing of corseted women. Instead, this a vital film, whose lace-trimmed bosom heaves with life. Theater director’s Josie Rourke‘s film debut about the rivalry between Mary Stuart (Saoirse Ronan) and Queen Elizabeth I (Margot Robbie) is unlikely to win over your picky high school history teacher’s heart, but it does bring a sense of immediacy to the lives of these monarchs who died centuries ago.

Continue reading ‘Mary Queen Of Scots’: Saoirse Ronan & Margot Robbie Are Both Royalty In This Gleefully Feminist Drama [Review] at The Playlist.
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‘The Informer’ Trailer: Rosamund Pike & Joel Kinnaman Pit The FBI Against The NYPD In New Thriller

Rosamund Pike and Joel Kinnaman team up in the new action thriller, “The Informer.”

However, those hoping this is more of an awards contender film that stars Rosamund Pike, but also Joel Kinnaman, you’re out of luck. “The Informer” is much more of a Joel Kinnaman mindless, action film that also stars Rosamund Pike. So depending on your sensibilities, you may either love this or be disappointed.

Continue reading ‘The Informer’ Trailer: Rosamund Pike & Joel Kinnaman Pit The FBI Against The NYPD In New Thriller at The Playlist.
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‘What She Said’ Review: The Complexity of Pauline Kael, With Punches Pulled

Film critic Pauline Kael might have hated the first eight minutes or so of Rob Garver’s “What She Said: The Art of Pauline Kael,” a fawning introduction to the life and times of the author and cultural icon. Or, she might have adored it. Halfway through Garver’s film, one of Kael’s own contemporaries laments that sometimes the former New Yorker critic would sit down for a film that seemed tailor-made for her sensibilities, only to lambast it later.

No matter how Kael might have felt about the doc’s opening minutes, she would have at least stuck around to see the whole thing through, and other audiences will benefit from the same. Despite that iffy start, Garver’s film blossoms into something more comprehensive than complimentary, a film that doesn’t balk at the trickier aspects of Kael’s career, even as it never fully engages with the tensions that informed her.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Mary Queen of Scots’ Review: A Royal Epic with Only One Great Scene

The great pleasure of historical biopics often lies in their visceral power to remind us that history is always personal for those who make it. From the Middle Ages to our first walk on the Moon — from Jesus of Nazareth to Freddie of Kensington — even the most mythic figures were flesh before they were folklore. Josie Rourke’s “Mary Queen of Scots” is an epic look at the intimate frustrations of two massively powerful young women who spend most of their energy navigating between who they are and what they represent.

This isn’t just a movie in which earthly human notions like sacrifice and self-worth shape the course of an empire; it’s a movie about those forces, and how they’ve always determined our fate. Alas, it’s also a movie that martyrs itself for its own ideas. While this flinty and forever relevant medieval drama perfectly embodies the struggles of its heroines,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Breaking Bad’ Movie: Here’s What Bryan Cranston Wants From a Jesse Pinkman Film

‘Breaking Bad’ Movie: Here’s What Bryan Cranston Wants From a Jesse Pinkman Film
[Editor’s note: This article contains spoilers for the finale of “Breaking Bad.”]

Ever since news broke that a “Breaking Bad” movie was in the works, fans have been speculating where creator Vince Gilligan might take the now-iconic story. While there is still no official confirmation that a film is even happening, the Albuquerque Journal recently reported that the movie had begun shooting in New Mexico under the title “Greenbrier.” It is still unknown whether Bryan Cranston, who starred as the antihero Walter White, or Aaron Paul, who played his sidekick Jesse Pinkman would return for a movie. In a recent interview with IndieWire, Cranston did not confirm or deny the movie’s existence, but wondered how Walter would even appear.

“Well, I keep hearing about it. I honestly haven’t seen a script, I haven’t read a script,” said Cranston. “So I’m not positive that it’s actually happening or if I’m even – I don’t even
See full article at Indiewire »

The Unique Challenge of World Building in ‘Black Panther,’ ‘First Man,’ and ‘The Favourite’

The Unique Challenge of World Building in ‘Black Panther,’ ‘First Man,’ and ‘The Favourite’
This year’s race for the Best Production Design Oscar is all about exotic world building, from “Black Panther’s” innovative Wakanda, to “First Man’s” ghostly moon landing, to “The Favourite’s” 18th century royal palace as a playground and battlefield for love and political maneuvering.

Hannah Beachler could become the first African-American to win the Oscar for production design for creating the fictional civilization of Wakanda in “Black Panther.” She designed an oasis of Afrofuturism with a distinct written language, which was the perfect complement to the social realism infused by director Ryan Coogler for this zeitgeist-grabbing Marvel phenomenon about black empowerment.

Read More: ‘Black Panther’: How Wakanda Got a Written Language as Part of its Afrofuturism

Production designer Nathan Crowley (“Interstellar”) found his lunar location for Damien Chazelle’s “First Man” in a gray quarry outside of Atlanta, where he carved a huge set. The historic moon walk,
See full article at Indiewire »

From ‘Homecoming’ to ‘Maniac,’ 30-Minute Episodes Solve TV’s Pacing Problem

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From ‘Homecoming’ to ‘Maniac,’ 30-Minute Episodes Solve TV’s Pacing Problem
When Julia Roberts heard “Homecoming” director Sam Esmail wanted episodes of the Amazon drama to be a half-hour long, she was against it. “I’m just a product of mediocrity, and so to me, drama is an hour,” she said to IndieWire. “Only teenagers can get drama done in 30 minutes. I was like, ‘What are you talking about? We’re tall. We need an hour.'”

The results, however, turned around Roberts on the issue. “It’s just brilliant,” she said. “I love it so much because, I mean, as an audience member, it just leaves you like, ‘Wait, it’s over?’ That’s how I feel every time.”

Once upon a time, there was no question of how long a TV episode of television “should be;” it was, “must be.” Network television had a schedule to keep and commercials to air, which meant that “Cheers” delivered 24-minute episodes; “E.
See full article at Indiewire »

90-Year-Old Disney Short Film About Oswald the Lucky Rabbit Discovered in Japan

“Neck ‘n’ Neck,” a short animated film created by Walt Disney in 1928, has been discovered in Japan (via The Telegraph). The black-and-white short, previously thought to be lost, features the character Oswald the Lucky Rabbit and runs two minutes. Disney created Oswald in 1927, just a year before Mickey Mouse turned him and his company into one of the world’s most beloved animated studios.

In a rather humorous twist, “Neck ‘n’ Neck” had not been lost this entire time; quite the opposite, as Japan’s Yasushi Watanabe has had a print of the short ever since he purchased it as a high schooler from a toy wholesalers’ market in the city of Osaka. Watanabe, now 84 years old, didn’t realize he had a lost Disney short film in his possession until he read David Bossert’s 2017 book “Oswald the Lucky Rabbit: The Search for the Lost Disney Cartoons.” The book
See full article at Indiewire »

"Mother of All of Us": Ida Lupino and the Label of Proto-Feminism

Ida Lupino (c. 1952). Courtesy Film Forum via Photofest.Much has been written about Ida Lupino’s centenary this year, and the renewed critical attention is a cause for celebration. The veteran screen actor and director of Golden Age Hollywood has too often been a name casually trotted out in lip service to women’s historical impact in the film industry. She most certainly did have that impact, but her films have proven difficult to see and completism with her work has been equally challenging. This began to shift after Martin Scorsese wrote an affectionate obituary of Lupino in a 1995 issue of The New York Times. Not long after, restorations and DVD releases would follow—some by Scorsese’s Film Foundation itself. Now, in her centenary year, both the British Film Institute and New York’s Film Forum are holding retrospectives to celebrate her, including works like her mother-daughter sports saga Hard,
See full article at MUBI »

MoviePass’ Parent Company Lost $137 Million in Three Months

No news tends to be good news when it comes to MoviePass, but the quiet couldn’t last forever. Variety reports that Helios & Matheson, the movie-ticket app’s parent company, lost $137 million in the third quarter of 2018 — once again raising doubts about MoviePass’ future. Helios & Matheson earned $81.3 million in revenue during Q3, nearly all of which came from MoviePass, but its cost of revenue was $109.6 million and it had an interest of expense of $95.6 million.

The filing in question includes a troubling note: “Our cash and cash equivalents may not be sufficient to fund our operations for the near future and we may not be able to obtain additional financing.” Many have questioned the continuing viability of MoviePass, but such doubts have usually been brushed aside by the company itself.

“During this transitional period for Helios and MoviePass, we have been focused on reducing our burn rate and striving to improve our business model,
See full article at Indiewire »

Apple Hires A24 To Produce A Slate Of Feature Films For The Tech Company

Unlike competitors like Netflix and Amazon, who seem to be interested in building their production studios from the ground up, Apple is deciding to team up with a respected, Oscar-winning company to help with its future film slate.

Variety is reporting that Apple has partnered in a multi-year agreement with independent film studio A24, enlisting the studio in producing a slate of films for the tech company.

Continue reading Apple Hires A24 To Produce A Slate Of Feature Films For The Tech Company at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

FilmStruck Lives? WarnerMedia Eyes New Version of the Service for 2019 Launch

The online movement to save FilmStruck might be working. Following a letter to Warner Bros. pleading for the continuation of the streaming service, one signed by Leonardo DiCaprio and top directors such as Paul Thomas Anderson and Christopher Nolan, WarnerMedia CEO John Stankey is reportedly now eyeing a new version of FilmStruck to be included as part of the company’s upcoming streaming platform.

According to Deadline, Stankey is attempting to find a compromise so that FilmStruck’s library of art house movies and foreign films doesn’t go completely extinct in terms of streaming availability. Stankey’s decision comes after pressure from the industry to save FilmStruck. In addition to Anderson and Nolan’s letter sent yesterday, filmmakers Martin Scorsese and Steven Spielberg wrote their own letter trying to get WarnerMedia to see the value of FilmStruck.

While the report should make FilmStruck fans more optimistic about its future,
See full article at Indiewire »
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