Indie News

‘The Walking Dead’ Review: ‘Open Your Eyes’ Serves Up Genuine Horror — Spoilers

‘The Walking Dead’ Review: ‘Open Your Eyes’ Serves Up Genuine Horror — Spoilers
[Editor’s Note: The following review contains spoilers for “The Walking Dead” Season 10, Episode 7, “Open Your Eyes.”]

Well, that was unexpected.

Siddiq (Avi Nash), still suffering from ever-worsening panic attacks, is able to pull himself together enough to realize that Alexandria’s plague is being caused by tainted water — due to a switched handle in the purification system and not from Gamma’s (Thora Birch) zombie dam, as previously theorized — and since Siddiq’s in charge of the water systems with Eugene (Josh McDermitt) gone, he blames himself. Dante (Juan Javier Cardenas) comes by to give him a pep talk and clicks his tongue in a distinct manner, causing Siddiq to realize that Dante is a Whisperer. In fact, he’s the one who forced Siddiq to watch as Alpha (Samantha Morton) beheaded his friends. Dante figures out Siddiq is onto him, they have a brief scuffle, and Dante strangles Siddiq, presumably to death.

Whew!

As a story turn,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Watchmen’ Review: Episode 5 Goes Through the Looking Glass to Find Answers, Intrigue, and Despair

‘Watchmen’ Review: Episode 5 Goes Through the Looking Glass to Find Answers, Intrigue, and Despair
[Editor’s Note: The following review contains spoilers for “Watchmen” Episode 5, “Little Fear of Lightning.”]

Remember what Agent Laurie Blake (Jean Smart) said last week, about people who wear masks and how they’re driven by pain? Well, she may have been talking to Sister Night (Regina King) at the time, but I believe after sitting down with “Mirror Guy” aka Looking Glass aka Wade Tillman (played by the excellent Tim Blake Nelson), he’d be her first case study toward proving that theory true. In a dense hour devoted to the root of Wade’s pain, veteran “Leftovers” scribes Damon Lindelof and Carly Wray guide the audience through a troubling series of revelations, all centered around Wade, yet consequential for everyone in the “Watchmen” universe.

Given that’s the design behind every “Leftovers” episode — using individual trauma to reflect universal concerns — it should come as no surprise that Episode 5 is deeply sad, difficult, and exceptional. Even by “Watchmen’s” lofty standards,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Ford V Ferrari’ Easily Takes The Win In The Weekend Box Office Race As ‘Charlie’s Angels’ Fizzles

A trio of beautiful superspies didn’t stand a chance this weekend at the box office, as it was the duo of Christian Bale and Matt Damon that not only took the top prize but did so in dominating fashion. Sadly, the battle between “Ford v Ferrari” and “Charlie’s Angels” proved to be far less interesting than the period racing drama that won the weekend.

Continue reading ‘Ford V Ferrari’ Easily Takes The Win In The Weekend Box Office Race As ‘Charlie’s Angels’ Fizzles at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Gal Gadot Wants Zack Snyder’s ‘Justice League’ Director’s Cut Released, Too

  • Indiewire
Gal Gadot Wants Zack Snyder’s ‘Justice League’ Director’s Cut Released, Too
“Wonder Woman” star Gal Gadot is the latest actor to voice support for Zack Snyder’s coveted rumored director’s cut version of “Justice League,” his 2017 DC Comics superhero movie. The director’s cut, according to some fans, currently being held hostage by the film’s distributor, Warner Bros.

Gadot on Sunday tweeted a behind-the-scenes image of herself along with the hashtag #ReleaseTheSnyderCut. (That tweet is embedded below.) Shortly after, Ben Affleck, who plays Batman in the DC universe, was also quick to chime in via Twitter.

When Warner Bros. announced in June that Ann Sarnoff would replace Kevin Tsujihara, who stepped down amid misconduct allegations, as the company’s chairman and chief executive officer, Snyder acolytes began trolling the Warner Bros. Twitter page demanding the release of the “Snyder cut” of the 2017 “Justice League.” The “Snyder cut” refers to a long-mythologized version of the film that failed to see
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Ford v Ferrari’ Outpaces the Box Office, While ‘Charlie’s Angels’ Is Hellish

  • Indiewire
‘Ford v Ferrari’ Outpaces the Box Office, While ‘Charlie’s Angels’ Is Hellish
Ford v Ferrari” roared to a very strong start as an original film that targeted adult audiences. At $31 million (which actually seems a little low; don’t be surprised if higher is reported Monday), it would be good news any week. This one, it owns the track practically by itself.

Theaters fervently hope that, starting with “Frozen 2” and “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood,” the holiday lineup reverses course. This weekend will see about an $110 million total across North America theaters, compare to $175 million last year — a 40% drop. At this point, no one’s looking to make up the gap between 2018 and 2019; that’s impossible. Performing at par for the rest of the year would be a victory.

James Mangold’s $100 million biopic with Matt Damon and Christian Bale as car designer and racer didn’t set records, but it’s a good performance that ranks as a significant achievement.
See full article at Indiewire »

Christopher Nolan Hopes Nitrate Print of ‘Rebecca’ Will Reestablish the Film’s Place in Hitchcock’s Legacy

  • Indiewire
Christopher Nolan Hopes Nitrate Print of ‘Rebecca’ Will Reestablish the Film’s Place in Hitchcock’s Legacy
It was the go-to motion-picture medium for the first half of the 20th century, but after nitrate film stock was discontinued by Kodak in 1952, nitrate prints of many classic movies were given a lonesome life locked away in vaults. That’s in part because nitrate film is very similar to guncotton, so flammable that it burns even underwater — haphazard handling can lead to disastrous effects when you’re talking about film moving through a projector at 24 frames per second, inches away from a red-hot 6,000-watt bulb.

“It’s a lot of work,” said Jared Case, curator of film exhibitions at the George Eastman Museum based in Rochester, New York. “It’s a museum artifact that needs a tool in order to be seen. You have to maintain the projectors. You have to make sure that they are clean and that they’re running properly. Our chief projectionist is so careful
See full article at Indiewire »

Pixar on Life After John Lasseter: ‘The Company’s Quite a Bit Different Now’

  • Indiewire
Pixar on Life After John Lasseter: ‘The Company’s Quite a Bit Different Now’
Among the wave of alleged sexual offenders whose behavior rose to the surface in fall 2017 was John Lasseter. It turned out the chief creative officer of Walt Disney Animation Studios and Pixar had a long history of misogynistic and toxic behavior toward his (mostly female) employees and by the following year, the company ousted him from his role under the guise of a resignation. His alleged behavior included a pattern of “grabbing, kissing, making comments about physical attributes,” and the Oscar-winning toon titan reportedly had minders assigned expressly to rein him in.

According to a recent piece in Vulture, life at the company has changed now in his absence. Disney has its newly launched streaming platform, Disney+, to celebrate, along with the upcoming, already well-received “Frozen 2.” (IndieWire’s review is here.)

Per the interview, Pixar president Jim Morris told Vulture that the studio was already prepping changes ahead of Lasseter’s exit,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Waves’ Makes Box Office Splash as Amazon and Netflix Stay Quiet

  • Indiewire
As Oscar contender “Ford v Ferrari” (20th Century Fox) opened well to adults around the country, A24 launched its own claim for awards consideration for specialty family drama “Waves,” starring Emmy-winner Sterling K. Brown. Of course, the point is to get audiences interested so the film can build.

Amazon opened CIA drama “The Report,” starring Adam Driver and Annette Bening, across the country two weeks ahead of its Prime access–and like Netflix, will no longer report grosses. This only makes more work for the box-office analysts who try to gauge how films like Netflix’s “The Irishman” and “Marriage Story” are performing in limited release.

Meanwhile, established successes like “Jojo Rabbit” (Fox Searchlight) and “Parasite” (Neon) continue to thrive in increasingly wide play.

The two best-reviewed films of the week, the Senegalese Oscar entry and Cannes prize-winner “Atlantics” and the French animated “I Lost My Body,” were released in
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Saturday Night Live’ Review: The Best and Worst of Harry Styles’ Hosting Debut

  • Indiewire
‘Saturday Night Live’ Review: The Best and Worst of Harry Styles’ Hosting Debut
This week’s “Saturday Night Live” saw musician (and noted comedy nerd) Harry Styles return to Studio 8H in the coveted dual host-musical guest role. Naturally, comparisons can be made to Justin Timberlake and the recent host/musical guest Chance the Rapper, but much like in his career post-One Direction, Styles had to make his own way here.

Host: Harry Styles

The go-to “SNL” monologue for a musical artist is, of course, a musical monologue. Yet despite the eventual piano, that’s thankfully not what the episode provided. Instead, “SNL” showed off Styles’ dry yet somewhat absurd sense of humor early with the opening monologue. Taking a page out of Zach Galifianakis’ playbook* with the piano and teasing a reunion with his One Direction brethren (minus Zayn Malik but plus Ringo Starr), the typical first-time hosting jitters were nowhere to be found. Not even during the close-up shot of “his” hands.
See full article at Indiewire »

Trump Reportedly Screened ‘Joker’ at the White House and Liked It

  • Indiewire
At long last, President Donald Trump finally saw “Joker.” According to Yahoo! News, a senior White House official confirmed to the outlet that he screened Todd Phillips’ revisionist DC origin story “for guests including ‘family, friends, and some staff.'” That same White House official confirmed that Trump indeed liked the movie.

Trump’s cinematic interests are well-documented. Amid his raving tweetstorms, the president has made mention of loving “Citizen Kane,” “Gone With the Wind,” and “The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly.” He has also starred on screens big and small, with an appearance in “Home Alone 2: Lost in New York” and a throwaway cameo in the second season of “Sex and the City,” to name a few.

Trump has also previously been outspoken about controversial 2019 movies before, as indicated when Universal Pictures’The Hunt” got cancelled over the summer for its unwelcome portrayal of violence amid mass shootings in this country.
See full article at Indiewire »

Willem Dafoe Talks ‘Motherless Brooklyn,’ ‘The Lighthouse’ & The Mysteries Of Performance [Interview]

With over a hundred acting credits to his name, you’d be hard-pressed to find a more productive actor in the business than Willem Dafoe. From superhero blockbusters to prestige pictures, to anime adaptations, to video games, to a nautical descent into madness, Dafoe has done it all, and now the actor joins us for a new episode of The Fourth Wall to discuss his incredible year between “The Lighthouse” and “Motherless Brooklyn.”

Read More: ‘Motherless Brooklyn’: Edward Norton Pulls The Thread On A Knotty ‘Chinatown’-Esque Detective Noir Mystery [Telluride Review]

It was only last year that Dafoe garnered awards recognition by way of a Best Actor nomination for his portrayal of Vincent Van Gogh in “At Eternity’s Gate” and Best Supporting Actor the year prior for his work in “The Florida Project.” While the 2020 Awards Season is still young, Oscar Buzz has been circling the actor yet
See full article at The Playlist »

‘Mrs. Fletcher’: Kathryn Hahn’s Brilliant Performance Stems From a Key Change to the Book

‘Mrs. Fletcher’: Kathryn Hahn’s Brilliant Performance Stems From a Key Change to the Book
When first reading Tom Perrotta’s 2017 novel, “Mrs. Fletcher,” Kathryn Hahn was struck by what proved to be a telling choice by the author.

“It was the dual stories that really intrigued me — and that fact that she was written in the third person and the son was written in the first,” Hahn said. “There was something very interesting in that to me, the fact that this was something [Perrotta], a man, would want to dig into: the interior life of this woman.”

The author’s book, which formed the template for HBO’s critically acclaimed limited series, switches perspective with each new chapter. The story starts in Eve Fletcher’s perspective, as the single mother packs up her only child, Brendan, for college, but it’s told through a disembodied narrator: “Eve cried most of the way home.” “All she’d wanted, from the moment she opened her eyes in the morning,
See full article at Indiewire »

State of the Festival: Venice 2019

  • MUBI
Above: JokerWas it really that big a surprise—for some even a sensation—that the main awards of the 76ª Mostra internazionale d'arte cinematografica di Venezia went to Todd Phillips' Joker (Golden Lion) and Roman Polański's An Officer and a Spy (Grand Jury Prize)? For weren't these the films most talked about before—and among the most widely discussed cum (mainly) celebrated during the festival proper? This was arguably one of the better jury decisions in years, a decision decidedly in favor of cinema as an art for and of the masses with the potential of making serious amounts of people ponder, maybe look differently at what they thought and believed (in) so far—though film did not have all the answers.Besides: This pair perfectly sums up the main themes and concerns addressed in the competition as well as some of the outstanding films to be found in the
See full article at MUBI »

What (Do) We Mean by Frank Cinema—and is That a Question or a Statement?

  • MUBI
Above: Candy Mountain“How much of this film is composed, and how much is improvised?” The obvious question posed by Robert Frank’s first film (coauthored by painter Alfred Leslie), Pull My Daisy (1959), is also posed, sometimes less obviously, by the authored and coauthored Frank films that follow it—an unwieldy filmography that has on occasion become even harder to access because of the unwieldy ways it was financed or put together. To wonder whether they’re Frank or just frank is arguably another way of interrogating their relative degrees of sincerity or subterfuge, non-fiction or fiction, single or collective authorship. And it’s ultimately our call whether any shot in a Frank film corresponds to a declarative statement or a question—something that might also apply to his better known, more celebrated, and noncollaborative still photography. “After seeing these pictures,” wrote Jack Kerouac of The Americans, “you end up
See full article at MUBI »

Quentin Tarantino Makes Heartfelt Appearance to Celebrate Dp Robert Richardson in Poland

Camerimage, the festival in Toruń, Poland dedicated to the art of cinematography, handed out its prestigious Frog prizes this evening. The big winner was “Joker” cinematographer Lawrence Sher, who won the top prize, the Golden Frog, in addition to the Audience Prize. The Bronze Frog was awarded to “The Painted Bird” Dp Vladimír Smutný, while “The Two Popes” Dp César Charlone won the Silver Frog. A full list of winners at the end of this article.

Now in its 27th year, Camerimage has become homecoming week for cinematographers from around the globe, with a vast number of the best DPs, past and present, in attendance. From an awards perspective — considering cinematographers nominate their colleagues — it’s hard to overestimate the value of DPs presenting their work and discussing their craft with their tight-knit community during the week-long celebration.

Sher — whose “Joker” screened early in the fest, and has been in
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Amélie’ Director Jean-Pierre Jeunet And Writer Guillaume Laurant May Make Sci-Fi Film ‘Big Bug’ For Netflix

It’s been six years since Jean-Pierre Jeunet, who gave us the one-two punch of “Alien Resurrection” and “Amélie” has directed a narrative feature film, but we may get a new film from him and “Amélie” writer Guillaume Laurant. The duo is reportedly getting back together to helm the sci-fi film “Big Bug” for Netflix.

Continue reading ‘Amélie’ Director Jean-Pierre Jeunet And Writer Guillaume Laurant May Make Sci-Fi Film ‘Big Bug’ For Netflix at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Oscar Isaac Compares ‘Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker’ To A “Chess Match”

We are about to see not only the end of Disney’s first ‘Star Wars’ trilogy since acquiring Lucasfilm, but the end of a 9-movie saga. We know that Palpatine will return, but that’s pretty much the only thing we know about the plot. Among the many promises of how it will be a satisfying ending, we can now add Poe Dameron himself, Oscar Isaac who says the film is like a “chess match.”

Read More: Disney Announces A Whole Lot Of New Release Dates, Including New Marvel And Star Wars Movies Through 2023

Speaking with Total Film, Isaac teased that the final installment in the Skywalker saga, “The Rise of Skywalker” will see the fight between Sith and Jedi come to an end.

Continue reading Oscar Isaac Compares ‘Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker’ To A “Chess Match” at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Disney+ Adds A Disclaimer For “Outdated Cultural Depictions” In Classic Movies, Still Pretending ‘Song Of The South’ Doesn’t Exists

We still have a long way to go when it comes to racism and representations in movies and TV shows, but we can at least agree we have made some progress compared to some of the Disney animated classics like “Dumbo,” “Lady and the Tramp” or “The Aristocats.” All of those movies can be seen on the Disney+ streaming service, but they include a disclaimer about the cultural context of certain scenes that can be considered pretty racist by today’s standards.

Continue reading Disney+ Adds A Disclaimer For “Outdated Cultural Depictions” In Classic Movies, Still Pretending ‘Song Of The South’ Doesn’t Exists at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Mark Ruffalo Speaks Out On Spider-Man Staying In The McU

One of the sad parts about the McU is that we didn’t get nearly enough scenes between Tom Holland’s Spider-Man and Mark Ruffalo’s Hulk. The characters barely shared the screen despite having a lot in common, depriving audiences of some fun banter. While Ruffalo’s future with Marvel is still unclear, we know that Spider-Man will definitely remain with the rest of the McU for the foreseeable future, and Ruffalo is understandably excited about it.

Continue reading Mark Ruffalo Speaks Out On Spider-Man Staying In The McU at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Don’t Underestimate ‘Joker,’ Which Reaffirms Its Place in the Awards Conversation After Camerimage Win

  • Indiewire
Don’t Underestimate ‘Joker,’ Which Reaffirms Its Place in the Awards Conversation After Camerimage Win
Despite persistent backlash dating up to and throughout its release, Todd Phillips’ “Joker” isn’t going away anytime soon. It’s almost redundant at this point to rehash the numerous takedowns levied upon the movie. It’s a celebration of violence! It will incite incels! Horrid acts of cruelty are committed against women and other innocent people! No matter, because the movie, having now crossed the $1 billion box-office mark, which is unheard of for an R-rated film, is here to stay.

Joker” cinematographer Lawrence Sher took the top prize at this weekend’s EnergaCamerimage festival in Torun, Poland, on Saturday. For his gritty lensing of early 1980s New York in a DC origin story that finds Joaquin Phoenix manically turning into the iconic Batman nemesis, Sher won the Golden Frog. This cinematography prize has gone to such films as “The Fortress,” “On Body and Soul,” “Lion,” “Carol,” “Leviathan,” and “Ida,
See full article at Indiewire »
An error has occured. Please try again.

Recently Viewed